Wheel of the Year: Yule

Hi everyone! Today we are going to talk about Yule since it is coming on Friday! So Yule is on the winter solstice which is December 21st. Some people celebrate it over a few days (Dec.21-Dec.23). It is the most North point on the wheel of the year. It is the darkest day of the year and represents the brightening of the days to come. Today we are celebrating the goddess giving birth to the sun god again.

On this day there are lots of ways to celebrate. A lot of these celebrations are very similar to those of Christmas. If you want to know why I suggest you check out my blog post about the history of yule. So some things you can do is burn the yule log to increase the light of the season; put up mistletoe; have holly and evergreen decorations to symbolize the promise of the return of life and springtime; and put up a yule tree with silver and white decorations to represent the goddess and god, or red and gold to symbolize the sun god specifically. You can also do gift giving and other traditional holiday fun.

Don’t forget, along with all these seasonal activities you can still go for a nature walk to see what is happening in the world, do a ritual for the deities around yule and winter, do some divination, or do some magick.

Some gods you can celebrate on Yule are: Baldur (Norse), Dionysus (Greek), Hodr (Norse), Holly king (Celtic), Horus (Egyptian), Mithras (Roman), Odin (Norse), Saturn (Roman), and Apollo (Greek).

Some goddesses you can celebrate on Yule are: Alcyone (Greek), Ameratasu (Japanese), Bona Dea (Roman), Cailleach Bheur (Celtic), Demeter (Greek), Frau Holle (Norse), Frigga (Norse), La Betana (Italian), and Spider Woman (Hopi).

I hope you all have a very blessed Yule! What are your plans for the sabbat? Let me know in the comments along with any other thoughts or questions you have. Also, make sure to follow me here and on twitter to get notifications when I post and when I upload videos to youtube. Until next time, Blessed Be!

Wheel of the Year: Samhain

Hi everyone! Happy Samhain, or Halloween if you will. Samhain is the minor sabbat that occurs between Mabon (fall equinox) and Yule (winter solstice). It falls on October 31st every year. Even though this sabbat is considered to be a minor one it is actually one of the most celebrated sabbats. We are half way to reaching the darkest day of the year since it was last balanced.

Samhain marks the day that the sun god passes on and goes to the underworld. This causes the veil to the spiritual world to be at it’s thinnest. Due to it being so thin spirits can easily travel to and from their realm and ours. This means we can communicate with them much easier. The goddess also transforms to her crone form on this day and spends the next couple months grieving the loss of her partner.

Since the veil is so thin this is a time we use to reconnect with our ancestors. We invite our ancestors to our home by leaving candles (or pictures of these loved ones) in our windows. We also sometimes have a feast of the dead. This is essentially when we set up an extra place at our table and leave a meal for our ancestors. Ways we may contact our loved ones is through divination (tarot cards, pendulums, scrying, etc) or through a Ouija board (not sure if I recommend this one though, at least not for beginners in necromancy).

After Samhain we look forward to Yule which is when the God is born again and spring is on the horizon.

To celebrate this day you can carve pumpkins (used to protect your home from any extra negative energies lurking around), go trick or treating/dress up (Christian’s used to dress up to disguise themselves from demons and monsters), divination (since the veil is thin messages will come through your cards easier and clearer), witchcraft (since the veil in thin there will be an abundance of energy to do you magick with), go for a walk to see how the seasons are changing, and as always do a ritual to honour your deities.

Some gods you can celebrate during this time are: Anubis (Egyptian), Osiris (Egyptian), Yama (Hindu), and Hades (Greek)

Some goddesses you can celebrate during this time are: Morrigan (Celtic), Hel (Norse), Freya (Norse), Demeter (Greek), Hecate (Greek)

Thank you so much for reading! I hope you have a great Samhain. If you’d like to hear about Samhain instead of reading about it make sure you check my youtube channel  tomorrow! Also, make sure you follow me on here and on twitter to make sure you get notifications when I post. Until next time Merry Meet and Blessed Be!

The Celtic Pantheon

So today I thought it would be good to continue our talk about pantheons. A couple weeks ago I talked about greek which you can read here: The Greek Pantheon. This week I am going to talk about the Celtic pantheon. I did some research to find the “top” worshipped gods and goddesses so if you worship someone from this pantheon that I didn’t mention please put them in the comments and what they’re all about and I can add it my post!

Gods

Aengus – God of love and youth. Animals are cat, dove, sparrow, deer. The swan was his symbol.

Dagda – “The Good God” The father god. He is the god of the arts, knowledge, magic, music, prophecy, prosperity, and regeneration. His symbols were a club, bottomless cauldron of plenty, and the harp.

Cernunnus – “the horned one” He is the god of  hunting, animals, fertility, and nature in general. Animals that were sacred to him: bull, ran, stag, and horned serpents.

Arawn – God of the underworld, terror, revenge, and war. His animals are the stag and dogs. His symbol is the cauldron.

Goddesses

Morrigan – goddess of war and death. Morrigan’s main animal is the crow or raven. She is a triple goddess. Morrigan is Anand (or Anu), a goddess of fertility, Badb, a war goddess who transforms into a crow, and Macha, the death crone.

Danu – Matriarch of Power. She is the mother goddess. Symbolizes rivers, water, wells, prosperity, magick, and wisdom.

Brigit – she is the goddess of art, blooming of the spring season, healing, high dimensions, livestock, poetry, smithing, and springs. She is a a triple goddess. One is in charge of poetry and inspiration; one is in charge of midwifery and healing, and the last is in charge of crafts and smiths.

So these are just a few celtic gods and goddess. Here are some links to some celtic deity statues Danu statue, Morrigan statue, and Cernunnos statue. I hope you enjoyed todays post. If you have a celtic god or goddess that I didn’t post about tell me about them in the comments and leave any other thoughts or questions there as well. Make sure you subscribe to my blog and my twitter to get notifications on when I post. Until next time, Merry Meet and Blessed Be.

 

Wheel of the Year: Beltane

Hi guys! Beltane is coming up so it’s time to continue our talk about the sabbats!

Beltane is celebrated April 30th and/or May 1st. It is also known as may day. The God is officially matured. At this time we are celebrating the union of the god and goddess and between man and woman. Now is a popular time for handfasting (wiccan marriages). At this time we celebrate fertility because now is the time animals are mating and for new beginnings. We also celebrate our sexuality at this time.

To celebrate we celebrate by braiding our hair, dancing around the may pole, and having bonfires. And like all our holidays we take a walk to see how nature is changing throughout the year. This holiday is great for celebrating with a group of people. In some cities you may find public Beltane celebrations that you can go to. I’d highly suggest checking it out. I hope to have the opportunity to someday. On Beltane it is thought that the veil between our realm and the fae realm are thin so now is your best chance of seeing fairies. You can encourage them to come by making them a little home outside and leaving out honey and milk.

Goddesses that are usually celebrated around this time are but not limited to: Artemis (Greek), Demeter (Greek), Flora (Roman), Hera (Greek), Persephone (Greek), Sheela-na-Gig (Celtic), Xochiquetzal (Aztec)

Gods that are usually celebrated around this time are but not limited to: Bes (Egyptian), Bacchus (Roman)/Dionysus (Greek), Cernunnos (Celtic), Kokopelli (Hopi), Pan (Greek), Priapus (Greek)

As always on the Sabbat it is customary to preform a ritual to honour the God and the Goddess. Now is also a good time to do divination on what the spring holds for you. Also if you like to do magick on the sabbat now is a great time for fertility and sex magick. 

Thanks for reading! Please leave in the comments how you’ll be celebrating this years Beltane. Also if you’d like to see a Beltane ritual I have done and really enjoyed check out this post Wiccan Rituals (Beltane ritual included). Lastly, make sure you subscribe so you get notifications when I post. Merry Meet and Blessed Be!

Wiccan Traditions

So much like Christianity there are different denominations of Wicca. Although these different traditions generally believe in the same basics the details are often different. There are many many different traditions of Wicca so below are some of the different traditions (but certainly not all)

Gardnerian Wicca:

After England removed the witchcraft law in 1950 Gerald Gardner “came out of the broom closet”. He rewrote the rituals of the coven he belonged to for accuracy. This Tradition is coven exclusive. You can’t really be part of this tradition as a solitary practitioner. In Gardnerian covens they have a degree systemin which one learns the craft. The coven has to initiate you into the coven. They do their work skyclad(naked).

Alexandrian Wicca:

Alex Sanders founded this tradition in 1960. It is inspired by Gardnerian Wicca. You still must be in a coven for this tradition. They also work skyclad and have similar rituals to Gardnerian. This tradition places more emphasis on ceremonial magick though.

Georgian Wicca:

George Patterson founded this tradition in 1970. Followers of this tradition are also known as the Georgian church. Rituals are inspired from Gardnerian and Alexandrian with some other elements added. In some of these covens members write their own rituals. Some work skyclad and others don’t.

Seax-Wicca:

Raymond Buckland founded this tradition in 1973. He was a protege of Gardner. Buckland taught the Gardnernian tradition for many years. He saw some flaws in it though so he started his own tradition. This tradition is based on Saxon traditions. Each coven decides if they will work skyclad or robed. Witches of this tradition can be initiated through a coven or through self-study.

Dianic Wicca:

This tradition focuses on the goddess with little talk of a god. The goddess is worshipped in her 3 aspects (maiden, mother, and crone). Since the 1970’s this tradition has been seen as the feminist movement of the craft. Some covens of this tradition are female only.

Celtic Wicca:

Tradition looks to ancient Celtic and Druidic deities and beliefs. There’s an emphasis on magickal and healing powers of plants, minerals, gnomes, fairies, and elemental spirits. Some rituals are derived from Gardnerian practice.

Green Wicca:

Although all Wicca is nature based this type of Wicca really focuses on nature. This type of Wicca tends to draw upon folklore, folk-religion, and folk magick. This tradition focuses a lot on the earth, trees, herbs, plants, and flowers for medicinal purposes and magickal value. They tend to grow their own herbs and have gardens. The deities worshipped varies on the Wiccan but typically Green Wiccans acknowledge the earth mother or a series of nature spirits as their deity. Typically spirits of nature, the dead (human and animal), or the fey are part of this tradition. This is the tradition I am currently interested in.

Wicca Series (Part 13): Wiccan Traditions

Hereditary Wicca:

This is a tradition that is usually not exclusive. Another tradition is typically involved with it. This is a tradition for those people who are fortunate to have Wicca run in the family. I hope my future children will be hereditary Wiccans

Eclectic Wicca:

This tradition is most common these days especially in solitary practitioners. This tradition is when you take bits and pieces of the various traditions and make your own that works best for you. You can also take elements from other pagan customs like Shamanism or even elements from other religions like Buddhism.

So there we have it, a description of common Wiccan Traditions. Don’t forget this is not nearly close to all of them. This is merely an overview of more common ones that are either fundamental to the creation of Wicca or that I find interesting.

What Wiccan tradition do you follow? Please feel free to leave thoughts and questions in the comment section! Merry Meet and Blessed Be!